Badluck,
kitten

thefirmamentblog:

potentiallypr0blematic:

I found this hilarious.

run Mars! Run!

I laughed way, way, way too hard at this…

misandry-mermaid:

naamahdarling:

lalondes:

PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE DON’T SCROLL PAST THIS.

Scarleteen is a vital queer and trans positive sexual health resource. Their staff do an amazing job of creating really comprehensive and helpful articles on literally every sexual topic you can imagine. They also provide live chats, advice columns, moderated discussion forums, and SMS-based peer support. This site has helped me on countless occasions, and I refer at-risk queer and trans kids to this site every single day.

Scarleteen is invaluable.

And Scarleteen needs your help.

During their annual donation drive this year, the site was only able to raise $1,500. Only fifty people out of Scarleteen’s 350,000 unique monthly visitors contributed to the fundraising drive.

This means that unless Scarleteen sees a stable, sustained, 50% increase in donations, the site will essentially be forced to go dark on May 1. No more new content, no more advice columns, no more forums, no more live chat, no more SMS support. 

This is devastating.

If Scarleteen goes dark, millions of young people, vulnerable queer and trans teens among them, will lose access to essential, fundamental sexual health resources. We cannot let this happen.

Please, please, please donate to Scarleteen. Consider making a recurring monthly contribution if you feel that this is within your means. Even $5 or $10 a month will go a long way to helping this very, very deserving organization.

And whether or not you’re able to donate at this time, please signal boost this and spread the word. Scarleteen does incredible, very necessary work, and they need our help.

This place does amazing, important work, and they are well worth supporting.  Sex ed in this country is a sick joke, and sites like this are having to take up the slack, run on donations from people like us who actually want the next generation to have happy, fulfilling, safe lives full of as much or as little sex as they want.

I just made a donation, and you should too!  Help support an org providing comprehensive, inclusive sex, gender, and health information to youth.

bobbycaputo:

braiker:

Are you fucking kidding me? Did we all just wake up in 1938?

The fuck is this?

wait, is this real? cause it’s fucked up as shit…

jtotheizzoe:

One of my favorite GIFs of one of my favorite NASA visualizations to preview Monday’s It’s Okay To Be Smart and get you excited and all that jazz. Think you can guess what tomorrow’s vid is about?

Blue = sea saltGreen = organicsRed = dustWhite = sulfates

Check out the full NASA video below, featuring simulated global “stuff in the air” over a two year period on Earth. Ain’t Earth beautiful? (Even if, as in this case, it’s a 3 million processor-hour computer animation)


shiny!

jtotheizzoe:

One of my favorite GIFs of one of my favorite NASA visualizations to preview Monday’s It’s Okay To Be Smart and get you excited and all that jazz. Think you can guess what tomorrow’s vid is about?

Blue = sea salt
Green = organics
Red = dust
White = sulfates

Check out the full NASA video below, featuring simulated global “stuff in the air” over a two year period on Earth. Ain’t Earth beautiful? (Even if, as in this case, it’s a 3 million processor-hour computer animation)

shiny!

adulthoodisokay:

what a time to be alive

I need this in my life.

adulthoodisokay:

what a time to be alive

I need this in my life.

bookoisseur:

policymic:

The Navy has figured out a way to convert water into fuel

In news that is sure to rock the fuel industry, the U.S. Navy has announced that they believe they have solved one of the world’s greatest scientific challenges: how to turn seawater into fuel. Last week, naval scientists successfully flew a small 2-stroke model airplane running on seawater-derived fuel, proving that engines can run on the energy source they’ve developed. Essentially the process extracts carbon dioxide and hydrogen from the water and recombines it into hydrocarbon chains that liquify via a metallic catalyst into a purely synthetic fuel source.

Read moreFollow policymic

THIS IS COOL.

Road Trip Wednesday is a ‘Blog Carnival,’ hosted by YA Highway where contributors post a weekly writing- or reading-related question that begs to be answered. Bloggers can link to their answers in order to grow the blog community.Each week’s question will be quick, and you can answer it in comments, on your own blog, on tumblr, twitter (hashtag #roadtripwednesday so we see it!), wherever you want.
This Week’s Topic: Tell us an author who inspires you.  Tamora Pierce. A million times over, Tamora Pierce. I would not be writing today, and I certainly would not be harboring publishing hopes of any kind, if not for her.  I mean, there are a lot of authors that I look up to; Neil Gaiman, Charles de Lint, Terry Pratchet, Margarett Atwood, Mercedes Lackey, Kurt Vonnegut…These are names that fill up my bookshelves more than any other. I wish I could write characters like Neil or Charles. I wish I could worldbuild like Terry or Mercedes. I wish I could capture the more esoteric philosophies running rampant in my head like Kurt or Margarett. The truth is, there are a lot of authors who have inspired me in different ways, but only one of them ever really convinced me to write.  I was nine or so, when I first found Alanna: The First Adventure in the library. By that point I spent most of my time hidden in the safety of books (I was neck-deep in bullying at school). Maybe it was because I had been bludgeoning my way through Anne McCaffrey two books previous, and The Hobbit before that, instead of reading something aimed at girls my age, but I connected with Alanna. I connected with her so thoroughly that I started writing. The first stories were horrible (I still have them, written as they were in an old diary that I had torn the lockable cover off of). The next ones were little better, though they were at least typed out in word documents with wordart title pages. But I was writing.  The thing was, writing was a hobby. I was told it often enough; it was “less of a career than math or science or engineering”. And, well, hobbies were the things that got made fun of. So I hid those stories and those hopes. Pirates, fantasy, magic, dragons, kingdoms in the stars…Worlds where I bested those bullies and had friends. They stayed locked in the computer through high school, but I was adding to them almost every day.  For years, the edge of her writing style was evident in my own. Those books, which I still take down and read, kindled in me a love for YA fantasy (the genre I almost skipped over) that has grown to encompass my own writing. It may have taken years for me to be willing to consider that writing did not have to be a buried thing, but it was thanks to her that I started writing at all. She took books from being a place to escape and made them a place to create and to dream, and if that’s not inspiration, I don’t know what is.

Road Trip Wednesday is a ‘Blog Carnival,’ hosted by YA Highway where contributors post a weekly writing- or reading-related question that begs to be answered. Bloggers can link to their answers in order to grow the blog community.Each week’s question will be quick, and you can answer it in comments, on your own blog, on tumblr, twitter (hashtag #roadtripwednesday so we see it!), wherever you want.

This Week’s Topic: Tell us an author who inspires you.

Tamora Pierce. A million times over, Tamora Pierce. I would not be writing today, and I certainly would not be harboring publishing hopes of any kind, if not for her.

I mean, there are a lot of authors that I look up to; Neil Gaiman, Charles de Lint, Terry Pratchet, Margarett Atwood, Mercedes Lackey, Kurt Vonnegut…These are names that fill up my bookshelves more than any other. I wish I could write characters like Neil or Charles. I wish I could worldbuild like Terry or Mercedes. I wish I could capture the more esoteric philosophies running rampant in my head like Kurt or Margarett. The truth is, there are a lot of authors who have inspired me in different ways, but only one of them ever really convinced me to write.

I was nine or so, when I first found Alanna: The First Adventure in the library. By that point I spent most of my time hidden in the safety of books (I was neck-deep in bullying at school). Maybe it was because I had been bludgeoning my way through Anne McCaffrey two books previous, and The Hobbit before that, instead of reading something aimed at girls my age, but I connected with Alanna. I connected with her so thoroughly that I started writing. The first stories were horrible (I still have them, written as they were in an old diary that I had torn the lockable cover off of). The next ones were little better, though they were at least typed out in word documents with wordart title pages. But I was writing.

The thing was, writing was a hobby. I was told it often enough; it was “less of a career than math or science or engineering”. And, well, hobbies were the things that got made fun of. So I hid those stories and those hopes. Pirates, fantasy, magic, dragons, kingdoms in the stars…Worlds where I bested those bullies and had friends. They stayed locked in the computer through high school, but I was adding to them almost every day.

For years, the edge of her writing style was evident in my own. Those books, which I still take down and read, kindled in me a love for YA fantasy (the genre I almost skipped over) that has grown to encompass my own writing. It may have taken years for me to be willing to consider that writing did not have to be a buried thing, but it was thanks to her that I started writing at all. She took books from being a place to escape and made them a place to create and to dream, and if that’s not inspiration, I don’t know what is.

“It was not the feeling of completeness I so needed, but the feeling of not being empty.”

Jonathan Safran Foer (Everything Is Illuminated)

Cell phones generate electromagnetic fields (EMF), and emit electromagnetic radiation (EMR). They share this feature with all modern electronics that run on alternating current (AC) power (from the power grid and the outlets in your walls) or that utilize wireless communication. Different devices radiate different levels of EMF, with different characteristics. …

The many potential negative health effects from EMF exposure (including many cancers and Alzheimer’s disease) can take decades to develop. So we won’t know the results of this experiment for many years—possibly decades. But by then, it may be too late for billions of people. …the entire power grid is an EMF-generation network that reaches almost every individual in America and 75% of the global population. Today, early in the 21st century, we find ourselves fully immersed in a soup of electromagnetic radiation on a nearly continuous basis. …

While cancer is one of the primary classes of negative health effects studied by researchers, EMF exposure has been shown to increase risk for many other types of negative health outcomes. In fact, levels of EMF thousands of times lower than current safety standards have been shown to significantly increase risk for neurodegenerative diseases (such as Alzheimer’s and Lou Gehrig’s disease) and male infertility associated with damaged sperm cells. In one study, those who lived within 50 meters of a high voltage power line were significantly more likely to develop Alzheimer’s disease when compared to those living 600 meters or more away. The increased risk was 24% after one year, 50% after 5 years, and 100% after 10 years. Other research demonstrates that using a cell phone between two and four hours a day leads to 40% lower sperm counts than found in men who do not use cell phones, and the surviving sperm cells demonstrate lower levels of motility and viability.

EMF exposure (as with many environmental pollutants) not only affects people, but all of nature. In fact, negative effects have been demonstrated across a wide variety of plant and animal life. EMF, even at very low levels, can interrupt the ability of birds and bees to navigate. Numerous studies link this effect with the phenomena of avian tower fatalities (in which birds die from collisions with power line and communications towers). These same navigational effects have been linked to colony collapse disorder (CCD), which is devastating the global population of honey bees (in one study, placement of a single active cell phone in front of a hive led to the rapid and complete demise of the entire colony). And a mystery illness affecting trees around Europe has been linked to WiFi radiation in the environment. …

[M]odern technology (the source of the humanmade electromagnetic fields discussed here) has fueled a remarkable degree of innovation, productivity, and improvement in the quality of life. If tomorrow the power grid went down, all cell phone networks would cease operation, millions of computers around the world wouldn’t turn on, and the night would be illuminated only by candlelight and the moon—we’d have a lot less EMF exposure, but at the cost of the complete collapse of modern society.

EMF isn’t just a by-product of modern society. EMF, and our ability to harness it for technological purposes, is the cornerstone of modern society. Sanitation, food production and storage, health care—these are just some of the essential social systems that rely on power and wireless communication. We have evolved a society that is fundamentally reliant upon a set of technologies that generate forms and levels of electromagnetic radiation not seen on this planet prior to the 19th century.

As a result of the central role these devices play in modern life, individuals are understandably predisposed to resist information that may challenge the safety of activities that result in EMF exposures. People simply cannot bear the thought of restricting their time with— much less giving up—these beloved gadgets. This gives industry a huge advantage because there is a large segment of the public that would rather not know.

Your cellphone is killing you (via bookoisseur)

Is it bad that the first thing I thought while reading this was “oooh wouldn’t EMF make an interesting magic system in a book”?

(Source: kateoplis)

thegeekykinkevent:

squallluis:

Just in case you missed this on twitter yesterday. Marvel and Star Wars are at it!

One day maybe I’ll be this good at social media.

<3

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